The Great Grey Owl

The Great Grey Owl can be found in North America as far east as Quebec to the Pacific coast and Alaska.The species in North America has been classified endangered under the Californian endangered species act.In Europe the Great Grey can be seen in Norway,Sweden,Finland,Estonia,also Russia.

This owl feeds on small rodents such as mice and squirrels and has a wingspan up to 60 inches.The Great Grey territory are usually coniferous forests and open glades where it prefers to hunt and nest.They often nest in abandoned hawk and eagle nests or on tree stumps.Breeding pairs in North America successfully fledge 70 to 80% of their young.

I am sure you agree this is a beautiful bird which i had great pleasure in photographing.

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Rescued Hedgehogs

These two Hedgehogs were rescued and cared for by the Wiltshire Wildlife Hospital.They were rescued from a garden during the daylight hours,and were underweight.They would have not survived the hibernation period.Since these images were taken they are both doing well.

Myself and my partner do voluntary work in our spare time for the Wiltshire Wildlife Hospital based in Newton Toney near Amesbury.

Mike and Marilyn run the hospital with a host of volunteers,and give all their time rescuing and rehabilitating sick and injured wild mammals and birds.This time of year is particularly busy with underweight Hedgehogs as its hibernation time and only the strongest will survive.

The Wiltshire Wildlife Hospital has well over 100 sick and injured  Hedgehogs at the moment,in which Mike and Marilyn work all hours keeping them fed,medicated and sheltered over the long British winter before the spring.

With very little funding,relying on mostly donations from the general public Mike and Marilyn are true heroes in which i have the utmost admiration and respect for.Without them and others the world would be a worse place for all wildlife.

According to the people’s trust for endangered species P.T.E.S. hedgehog numbers have declined this century by nearly 40% in towns and cities and nearly as much in the countryside due to loss of habitat,pestisides reducing earthworm numbers,also slug pellets,rat poisons used in our gardens without thought.Rule of thumb,if you have hedgehogs in your garden do not use them.Give nature a chance,otherwise in the years to come our hedgehogs will only feature in a child’s bedtime story.

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